Public prayers, the content of retreat seminars, advice given to leadership, briefings on ethics and behavioural issues, the content of an encouraging word during staff meetings, advertisements of religious events, marriage and family views (Dart 2011) and more provide many opportunities to potentially bless or offend Airmen. Many books have been written on individual Chaplains’ lives1. Much has also been written about Chaplaincy and current issues or hot topics as they relate to Chaplaincy. A recurring theme of discussion in Chaplaincy revolves around the first amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America.

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