Imagine if you will, be it in the present or future, a time in which the third world countries are more actively engaged in Christianity than the countries of the West. Envision a world where the number of Angolan believers far surpasses that of those in the United States of America. Or the small Korean population of professing Christians outnumbering those found in the large country of Canada. Envision a time when the tiny island of Fiji accounts for more brothers and sisters in Christ than any country found on the continent of Europe. This would go so far as to assume that rather than the West sending missionaries to the third world, the prevailing missional trend would be for the third world to reach the West with the Good News of Christ (Altrock 2004:4). One must not look far ahead to imagine times such as these, because in fact, this is the situation that we, as Westerners, currently find ourselves facing. What is causing this sweeping and dramatic change?

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